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DateLecture
08 October 2019Poetry and Art of the First World War. The music of Wilfred Owens and his contemporaries.
05 November 2019Coffee from Arabia to the coffee house.
03 December 2019Foreigners in London, from 1520 to 1677. The artists who changed the course of British Art
07 January 2020Kicking and Screaming: A brief story of Post-War British Art
04 February 2020The anatomical drawings of Leonardo Da Vinci - a surgeon's view.
03 March 2020Ancient Egyptian artistry in glass
07 April 2020The mysterious disappearance of the Ghent altar piece
05 May 2020The Green Man
09 June 2020This is Wren - the Classical, the Baroque and the City of London churches
01 September 2020Winston Churchill - the artist.
06 October 2020How the women of Paris lived and died in the 1940s.
03 November 2020Last Supper in Pompei
01 December 2020In the kingdom of Sweets

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Poetry and Art of the First World War. The music of Wilfred Owens and his contemporaries. Denis Moriarty Tuesday 08 October 2019

Denis Moriarty spent most of his early working life as a BBC TV Music and Arts producer. After his National Service as an infantry officer he read history at St John's College Oxford. He lectures widely for The Arts Society, the National Trust, summer music and literary festivals. He has led architectural and historic tours in England, in Europe and India. He also sang for many years with the Philharmonia Chorus.

The Great War changed the world and society for ever. Yet out of the carnage, in addition to herosim and courage  emerged fine poetry, art and music; often as much indignant as patricotic. This presentation has the poems of Wilfred Owen at its core, set in the context of this fellow soldier poets; Sassoon, Brooke, A A Milne and the Rev George Studdart Kennedy (Woodbine Willie). It is illustrated by the war artists, among them Paul and John Nash, Nevinson, Orpen and Sargent. Archive photography and musical extracts from Elgar, Butterworth, and Britten as well as the songs of the soldiers in the trenches will complete the many faceted image.